WHY IS MUSIC GOOD FOR BABIES?

All children have an innate musicality, and from their earliest days babies respond to music. Just think of the lullabies you sing to calm them down, or the rhythmic noises (ssh, ssh, ssh) we make to stop them from crying. But why is music good for babies?

Exposure to music (and especially participation in structured music sessions) helps babies’ physical, emotional and intellectual development.  A 2012 study from McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind showed that babies who participated in interactive music classes in their first year “showed better early communication skills…smiled more, were easier to soothe, and showed less distress when things were unfamiliar or didn’t go their way.

How is music good for babies?

Music benefits the babies’ brains

Musical activities strengthen pathways in the brain and can contribute to cognitive and sensory development. Many scientists believe that active participation in music is a brain-development exercise.

Music helps to brighten babies’ moods

Well chosen music or musical activities can brighten you baby’s moods, and singing favourite songs together can create healthy, happy associations that can be called on at different times.

Musical activities can boost language development

According to Patricia Kuhl from iLABS  “pattern perception is an important cognitive skill, and improving that ability may have long-lasting effects on learning.” In music classes almost every activity is directed to recognising, learning and repeating patterns.

Music classes for babies can boost motor skills

From gross motor skills like balancing, bouncing and jumping, to fine motor skills like grasping musical instruments, scarves or puppets, music classes develop a range of motor skills in babies.

Music helps to strengthen your relationship

From gross motor skills like balancing, bouncing and jumping, to fine motor skills like grasping musical instruments, scarves or puppets, music classes develop a range of motor skills in babies.

The McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind study has shown that moving to music helps to release oxytocin (a hormone associated with empathy, trust, and relationship-building).

Musical activities let you spend time together, doing something that you love.

The research showed that participation in music sessions has greater benefits than just playing music in the background.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.